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Thread: Open Vehicle Monitoring System

  1. #1
    Senior Member markwj's Avatar
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    Open Vehicle Monitoring System

    Why?

    We are a group of enthusiasts who want an interface to be able to talk to our cars remotely, perhaps add on-car displays (such as heads-up speed), and we want to have fun doing it.

    What is it?

    The Open Vehicle Monitoring System is three things:

    1. A low-cost module that fits in the car. It is powered by the car, talks to the car on the CAN bus, and uses the GSM cellular network to talk to its user.
    2. A server. The car module can be configured to either talk to the server (via UDP/IP or TCP/IP over the Internet) or the user directly (via SMS).
    3. A cellphone App. This talks to the server (via TCP/IP HTTP protocol) to retrieve messages from the car and issue instructions.


    Part [1] is all that is required. You can use a cellphone and SMS messages to talk to the App. It requires a SMS messaging plan on the SIM card in the GSM modem in the car.

    Parts [2] and [3] provide a much more seamless and powerful experience, but are optional. It requires a small data plan on the SIM card in the GSM modem in the car.

    Even if you choose [2]+[3], you can still use [1] as well (for initial setup as well as ongoing on-demand).

    The Car Module

    The car module is the hard part. We require an extremely reliable and low-power module to fit in the car. While it is relatively simple for a hobbyist to create one of these, the hard part is making a common platform that a group of hobbyists can get behind, and to make it very high quality. Home-soldered connections and US$100k electric cars don't go well together.

    What we've done is take the foundational work done by fuzzy logic and others, to build a base platform module. We've then negotiated with factories in China (we live just over the border in Hong Kong) to get this professionally built.

    The module plugs into the car DIAG port, which provides both power and a CAN bus connection that the module can transmit/receive messages on.

    The platform itself is based on a PIC18F2680 processor and SIMCOM GSM module. Factory built and assembled, but based on an open source extendable architecture. You can either buy these modules pre-built, or build your own. Any profits on the sale of hardware will got to charity.

    The SIMCOM GSM module has the ability to send/receive SMS messages, as well as a built-in IP stack for GPRS communication. It allows the module to talk both communication protocols with very little PIC software required. We decided to use these modules (rather than USB modems) for reliability reasons, as well as the SIMCOM built-in support for IP protocol.

    The attached picture show the initial prototype we worked with. The square board is the prototype CPU + CAN controller based on Fuzzylogic's design. This is a rough proof-of-concept prototype, but you can see the quality of factory production we're getting.

    Name:  OVMS_CAN_CPU.png
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    The final version re-works the CPU+CAN board to be rectangular and fit as a plug-in piggy-back on the SIMCOM module we've sourced. We've also re-worked the board layout to separate the CAN bus across a cicuit-board divide (to keep the CAN signals very simple and physically separated from the rest of the components). In the final version, we also extend the unused I/O pins of the CPU out on expansion pins (to allow for such things as in-vehicle displays). It all fits in a small case, is extremely low power, and has two LEDs for diagnostics and a windscreen / rear window stick-on GSM antenna for optimal reception. Overall, the design is very elegant and extremely robust.

    The in-car module can be configured to just be a passive listener on the CAN bus, but can also be an active participant and transmit control messages onto the bus. It can even just relay CAN bus messages over the Internet to the Server/App. It is very flexible and has enough RAM and ROM to do some interesting things.

    Users can either follow the schematics to build their own compatible boards, or buy them pre-made from us. We expect to be able to charge just US$99+shipping for pre-assembled in-car modules (the CPU+CAN controller module, SIMCOM GSM module, car DIAG cable, housing box and GSM antenna). This is a non-profit endeavor, with any profits inadvertently made being donated to charity.

    The Server

    The server is a simple open source server which talks two protocols - one to the car and the other to the cellphone App.

    The car protocol is built on UDP using encrypted communication packets. Two passwords are used - one to talk to the server and the other to talk to the App.

    If the car module wants to send a message to the server, it uses the first password. Once the server receives the message, it can decrypt and act on the instruction contained. Communications of this type are used for network registration and PUSH notification messages to Apple/Android phones, or other alerts.

    If the car module wants to send a message to the user, it uses the second password. The server has no ability to decrypt such messages, so merely passes them on to the cellphone App transparently. The cellphone App itself decrypts and acts on the message. In this way, as only the car module and cellphone App have the password, the server has no way to spy/eavesdrop on these messages. Communications of this type are used for such things as car GPS location updates.

    The server also includes a web interface for basic functions such as setting the password, registering the car and checking status.

    The CellPhone App

    The API to the car and the server is open and will be published. Anyone can write to it, and we hope they will.

    Initially, we intend to release a standard iPhone and Android App, but anyone is welcome to follow the API and write their own. A screen shot of the prototype iPhone App we are working on is attached.

    Name:  OVMS_iPhone_ScreenPrototype.png
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    Open Source

    The entire project will be open source - from the hardware schematics to the APIs to the car and server firmware. We will be loading up what we have onto github within the coming few weeks.

    The purpose of this project is to get the community of Tesla, and other, tinkerers to be able to expand the project. We can't do it all, and there is so much to do. What we are doing is providing an affordable and flexible base that the community can work on and extend.

    Everything is open, and APIs are public. Other car modules can talk to the server, and other Apps can show the status and control the car. This will be a foundation that will hope others will interface to and and build upon.

    When will it be ready?

    We have been working hard on this for the past couple of months. Initial prototypes have been made and tested; and we are very happy with the choice of factory and their work. The hardware design is now being finalized and we will soon be ready to start the first production run. If there is sufficient interest, final hardware will be available within the next two-to-three weeks. If we can't get sufficient interest, we'll just build it for ourselves and not worry about the larger community.

    How does it compare to the Tesla Tattler?

    The Tattler will be an off-the-shelf product offering a purely-SMS controlled solution to controlling roadster charging (as well as other such functions). It is built on some fairly sophisticated hardware and requires no user 'tinkering' to get it working. From our understanding, you just plug it in and play. It connects to the car in the same way as OVMS, but the cellular modem is very different.

    This project is as an open-source extensible framework based on SMS and UDP/IP control, for enthusiasts. It is designed to be controlled by SMS, websites and/or cellphone Apps.

    Thanks

    So many people to thank. W.Petefish for sourcing the car connector, Fuzzylogic for the original hardware and software design and demonstration of it working, Scott451 for figuring out many of the Roadster CAN bus messages, and many others for showing that this kind of thing can work in the real world.

    Please help us by answering the survey, so we can gauge interest. Any questions? Ask away...

    Thanks,
    markwj and foxium.

  2. #2
    Senior Member markwj's Avatar
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    An update:

    Thanks for all the responses. We're particularly grateful for all the offers to help out.

    Due to restrictions in the forum software, we can't see the names / logins of those who responded with what, but the numbers are OK for the first build. Accordingly, we are proceeding with the first factory run (and hoping the numbers go up when the modules are actually available) and should have hardware within 2-to-3 weeks.

    Next steps:

    For those interested in helping with development, please PM me so that we can get the details out to you and find out who can help with what. We'll also add you on to the reservation list for the first batch of modules.

    For those who just just want a module in their car, please also PM me to get on the reservation list for the first batch of modules (which will be limited quantity).

    We expect to have the code up on github, and the server API available, sometime early next week. The clients can then be written to that, and more eyes can go through the code.

    Thanks,
    markwj and foxium.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Lloyd's Avatar
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    How does this compare to Tesla's application that was demonstrated at the Beta event? Is not much of what you are trying to accomplish as well as the hardware already in the model S and already done by Tesla, or are you building specifically a Roadster device?
    SP-2823(sold), Tesla/Rav4EV, P+17252, XP-12

  4. #4
    Model S R77 efusco's Avatar
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    This seems to only duplicate what Tesla is already doing/planning for the Model S. What features would your product add that would make me consider spending extra money for it?
    Evan E. Fusco, MD--Nixa, MO
    Model S R77/VIN-1267-- Black 85kWh (non-perf), Tech, Lacewood trim, tan interior, Sound Studio, Air Suspension, 19" rims, twin chargers, HPWC
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  5. #5
    Senior Member markwj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd View Post
    How does this compare to Tesla's application that was demonstrated at the Beta event? Is not much of what you are trying to accomplish as well as the hardware already in the model S and already done by Tesla, or are you building specifically a Roadster device?
    Quote Originally Posted by efusco View Post
    This seems to only duplicate what Tesla is already doing/planning for the Model S. What features would your product add that would make me consider spending extra money for it?
    Our current focus is on the Tesla Roadster, as it doesn't have any remote monitoring/alerting ability. There are also other EVs in a similar situation.

    But, our hopes go much further. If you use the manufacturer's system, you get what they give you and have no ability to extend it or do it another way. Even the Leaf with its extensive Carwings system doesn't expose battery SOC% to the user.

    What we are trying to build is an open base that can be extended by enthusiasts. Given the right firmware, it should work in any car with a can bus. It is obviously most applicable to cars with no remote monitoring/alerting ability.

  6. #6
    Member kgb's Avatar
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    I am interested in these solutions, but I guess it depends on how much it will be.
    Model S #5253 - Black 85kWh

  7. #7
    Senior Member markwj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kgb View Post
    I am interested in these solutions, but I guess it depends on how much it will be.
    We're estimating US$99+shipping for the enthusiast-level hardware. Non-profit, any inadvertent profits going to charity. Software is open source.
    PLEASE NOTE:
    These musings are the copyrighted intellectual property of the author, and are intended as part of a conversation among the Tesla Motors Clubs membership.
    My words may not be quoted by any third party outside the Tesla Motors Clubs forums, without my express consent.

  8. #8
    Head Moderator / Administrator doug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markwj View Post
    Due to restrictions in the forum software, we can't see the names / logins of those who responded with what, but the numbers are OK for the first build.
    If you're talking about the poll, it has to do with the settings you choose as you set it up.

  9. #9
    Senior Member markwj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by doug View Post
    If you're talking about the poll, it has to do with the settings you choose as you set it up.
    Doug, yes about the poll. Any way I can see who (ie; usernames) voted for what?

  10. #10
    Roadster #1144 + Sig 114 dsm363's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markwj View Post
    Doug, yes about the poll. Any way I can see who (ie; usernames) voted for what?
    I don't know if you can change a current poll but you can create a new one. There is a box you check to make the votes public.

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