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Thread: Home EV charging in apartment block complex carparks

  1. #1
    Senior Member markwj's Avatar
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    Home EV charging in apartment block complex carparks

    In Hong Kong, most people live in apartment blocks with car parks on the first few floors (or sometimes underground). Sometimes the car park spaces are owned by the owners themselves, and sometimes rented out. They are always in common areas.

    I am fortunate, as I live in a house with my own garage, and can do whatever I like (150Amp 240V 3 phase). But, those in apartment blocks need to get Owners Committee, Building Management and power company approval for installation of charging facilities.

    There has been a lot of government and power company emphasis here on public charge points (shopping centres, etc), but I really fail to see the point. Hong Kong is a small city and people rarely drive more than 80Km (50miles) a day. My own commute from owe side of Hong Kong to the other is about 40Km round-trip. I think the government is just going after the 'easy target' and not addressing the real problem.

    As Tesla (and EVs in general) are fairly new to Hong Kong, I'm interested in hearing about peoples experience with charging arrangements in other countries.

    I was asked by Tesla to think of something 'big' for them to go after in Hong Kong, and I'm thinking this may be it. If I buy an apartment here, legislation exists to force building management to allow me to connect telephone, power, and other utilities (legally I believe this is known as an "easement" Easement - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia). What about legislation to enforce the right to electrical power for car parks?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tesla HKG View Post
    My biggest problem is to install a power point in my underground parking spot. i asked the management company in my apartment. It seems that it involves a lot of regulations and it is very hard to have it done.
    Quote Originally Posted by Model S_HKG View Post
    Guys, I live in Happy Valley. I am bugging the building management and the owners committee just about everyday to give me the permission to install a EV charger in my car park or a shared one in the common parking area. However, they are giving me rubbish like legal concern, insurance concern, aesthetic concern, to technical worries etc etc...

  2. #2
    '08 #383 SByer's Avatar
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    I think it's something big to go after globally! But yes, a first win anywhere will help the dominoes being to fall. I think it's a great idea.

  3. #3
    Senior Member markwj's Avatar
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    I'm also wondering If the right of easement already exists if you own the car parking space (as is often the case in older buildings). The only issue might be the lack of previous use of EV charging. A test case would be interesting.

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    Model S P26 (Aus) meloccom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markwj View Post
    I'm also wondering If the right of easement already exists if you own the car parking space (as is often the case in older buildings). The only issue might be the lack of previous use of EV charging. A test case would be interesting.
    I think I may be that test case.
    I own an investment apartment in Sydney 50 meters down the road from where I live.
    I rent out the apartment without the parking space so I can park my car off street and have done for many years.
    The building I live in is older and has no parking whatsoever, making the prospect of any plug-in vehicle difficult. Plus I have the additional problem that my tennant probably does not want me to tap into his electricity supply to charge my plug in vehicle.
    Like many, my life was changed by following the birth and development of the Tesla Roadster, and it convinced me that my next vehicle would have a plug, but to do that I would need to solve the charging issue.
    Over the last 2 years I have worked with the executive committee of the owners corporation to gain permission to install a separate electricity supply to the garage of my investment apartment and I have recently gained approval to do so, the installation is scheduled to happen in 2 weeks.
    Without going into too much detail the process involved writing a specific by-law (Rule of the building) that dealt with plug in vehicles.
    Contrary to my belief that they would think I was a crack-pot they were very interested in the process, a number expressed that they would like to do the same once plug-in vehicles become more available.
    If anyone wants more information, including a copy of the by-laws, PM me on this forum.

  5. #5
    Senior Member markwj's Avatar
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    Is it fair to say, that in an environment like Hong Kong, it is only sensible to:

    1. Install 220volt 13amp chargers at home and office car parks (where charge duration will likely be 8 hours or more)
    2. Install high speed chargers at short-term locations (airport, shopping malls, etc)


    I get about 10km range added for every 1 hour at 13amp 220volt.

    To me, there seems to be little point in deploying 13amp 220volt chargers in shopping malls, or on-street parking, where people stay for just a couple of hours, but that is the emphasis here in Hong Kong.

    I realise that this has been discussed elsewhere here, but I am interested in the situation in Hong Kong. There are no long trips here, and no-one would have an electric car for an overnight hotel stay (ok, almost no-one). Countries like Singapore are in the same situation.

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    Shenzhen has a electric taxi project with BYD e6 cars. They are installing public Charging points. Maybe as well in Hongkong?

    DailyTech - Unlike U.S., China's Smaller Electric Vehicle Plan Puts Local Firms First


    emq: Power Quality / EV Charging Solutions

  7. #7
    mod squad TEG's Avatar
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    I linked a bunch of pictures of BYD EV taxi charge stations over here:
    My Nissan Leaf Forum : View topic
    Last edited by TEG; 2011-06-03 at 08:15 AM.

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    Junior Member amwt's Avatar
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    In spite of the dominance of a handful of conglomerates and lack of progress in antitrust legislation in Hong Kong, I think telecommunications is one shining light where the market is intensely competitive and has resulted in tangible consumer benefits. Perhaps OTFA's guidelines and related statutory rights regarding building and facility access can provide useful references

    http://www.ofta.gov.hk/en/tas/ftn/ta950518.html
    http://www.ofta.gov.hk/en/tas/ftn/950518a.html

    Unfortunately there is no competition in electricity generation, transmission and distribution at all in Hong Kong.

  9. #9
    Senior Member markwj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amwt View Post
    In spite of the dominance of a handful of conglomerates and lack of progress in antitrust legislation in Hong Kong, I think telecommunications is one shining light where the market is intensely competitive and has resulted in tangible consumer benefits.
    In particular given where they came from (unbalanced monopoly with a guaranteed 16% return on investment, with unprofitable domestic service subsidized by IDD). I spent some years working with OFTA during the PNETS fiasco at the birth of the Internet in Hong Kong. The situation now is a lot better.

    I've had some interesting conversations off-forum about this topic, and have been meaning to update.
    PLEASE NOTE:
    These musings are the copyrighted intellectual property of the author, and are intended as part of a conversation among the Tesla Motors Clubs membership.
    My words may not be quoted by any third party outside the Tesla Motors Clubs forums, without my express consent.

  10. #10
    Junior Member amwt's Avatar
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    As Mark said those few who live in houses in Hong Kong are sorted. Those who are in blocks/estates with well run Incorporated Owners will also stand a reasonable chance with a bit of politicking and persuasion with the committee. The worst will be those new or near new developments with the developers still running the building management scam. The key to new developments is for the developers to think that EV chargers are a "luxury" feature good for their gimmicky marketing. The key to sold developments still under puppet building management appointed/owned by the original developers is for the owners to kick them out.

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