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Thread: Vulnerable to crosswinds on highway? NOT!

  1. #31
    It's about THIS car. Al Sherman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wycolo View Post
    Yesterday: serious sidewinds (or oblique) on 100% dry good pavement. With STD setting there was NO feedback to steering wheel; the car just moved over an amount corresponding to strength of wind gust. All predictable and comfortable. No YAW (fishtailing) or other instabilities detected. On I-80 did some serious blasting past semis @~90 mph (who wants to meander past a sashaying rig?). My first outing (120 miles rt) in non-winter conditions. I think I could detect a slight bit of 'snow tread slop'. Overall: very happy camper.
    --
    Nice wycolo. Way to really put her through the paces! Good stuff. Be careful.
    Al Sherman Model S/P14,835 Model X/P1950 (for the wife)
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  2. #32
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    Al, if anyone knows about crosswinds it should be you!

  3. #33
    It's about THIS car. Al Sherman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Electric1 View Post
    Al, if anyone knows about crosswinds it should be you!
    LOL. Oh the stories I could tell! However we can't crab the MS and maintain a constant course. YET.
    Al Sherman Model S/P14,835 Model X/P1950 (for the wife)
    Retired Aviator VIN: 6283 Delivery 3/12/13

  4. #34
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    I would think the solution would be to drive much faster. That way your relative wind becomes more of a headwind and the awesome aerodynamics of the S take over. This, I think, is a good solution to many of the problems on these forums. Just drive faster!
    Standard 85kwh, Blue, Air Suspension, Tech: Reserved 11/30/2012 Delivered 3/10/13!

  5. #35
    It's about THIS car. Al Sherman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plug Me In View Post
    I would think the solution would be to drive much faster. That way your relative wind becomes more of a headwind and the awesome aerodynamics of the S take over. This, I think, is a good solution to many of the problems on these forums. Just drive faster!

    Way too much science involved and probably over my head. I don't think speed will have any affect on the effect of a direct cross.
    Al Sherman Model S/P14,835 Model X/P1950 (for the wife)
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  6. #36
    S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13 jerry33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RDoc View Post
    Well, yet again Citroen had some good ideas with the DS series. It had active hydraulically augmented steering set up so that at higher speeed there was a small range of steering which was less sensitive so you could make precise corrections with less tendency to over correct. At lower speed and outside that range it was normal. The effect was that staying within a lane at highway speed used the less sensitive area. I never noticed any particular cross wind sensitivity but the car was also quite aerodynamic and the weight distribution was strongly front biased.
    Not to mention the distance between the front wheels was about 12" wider than the distance between the back wheels.

    - - - Updated - - -

    If the tire pressures are not correct (in particular if they don't have the same balance front to rear as on the vehicle placard--and assuming no mistakes in the placard recommendation) a crosswind will push one axle more than the other causing the car to turn. Because wind is seldom steady, this causes the car to wander. So if your having a problem, first check the tire pressures. Second try one finger steering. If there is still a problem check the alignment--in particular unequal camber from side to side can cause this. If both these are okay, experiment with a bit more pressure in the rear than in the front.
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  7. #37
    Burrito Founder brianman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRP3 View Post
    Get a room.
    /deepbellylaugh
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    PLEASE NOTE: these musings are the copyrighted intellectual property of the author, and are intended as part of a conversation among the Tesla Motors Clubs membership. My words may not be quoted by any third party outside the Tesla Motors Clubs forums, without my expressed consent. Especially the NYT, which is clearly ethically challenged.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by nleggatt View Post
    Ok, maybe I'm jumping into the fire here, BUT, the car is pushed around a-lot by cross winds.
    Hmm. I thought it was pushed around less by crosswinds than my old Toyota Echo. Maybe it's all to do with what you're used to.
    I take "Electro", my amazing Model S, to the train station: yes, it's a station wagon

  9. #39
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    I think you're probably on to it. My S and my last car, a Mini, both have electric steering. The Mini is not a big car, and had an excellent chassis with great feedback and sharp responses. But it, like the S, always seemed a little bit more affected by freeway crosswind than other cars I've owned. It may be because there's a little bit of a dead zone in the center of the steering in electric steerers.

  10. #40
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    Good news. I finally have my car. Yesterday, the first day I drove it to work, we had high winds for most of the day. My route to work takes me through many areas (back roads, then highway). I put the car in standard mode and drove through the crazy winds crossing the highway at various speeds. The car was rock solid for the most part. I was greatly concerned about this aspect, but no longer fear it after the drive.

    The only real movements I felt from the wind were when I was at a stop light. I could feel a little movement in the higher part of the cabin. Outside of that, nothing really.

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