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Thread: 19" Turbine Wheel Solution

  1. #81
    S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13 jerry33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ceilidh View Post
    I would have assumed that since the aftermarket wheels have to bolt onto the same pegs as the OEM wheels, that the lug nuts would then be the same. Apparently this is entirely wrong. For me, that was not at all obvious.
    Wheels have several dimensions that interface with the car. Getting them all right for a particular car isn't always easy. It doesn't help that many places that sell wheels are familiar with neither the wheels nor the car.
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  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ceilidh View Post
    I would like to second the motion to confirm that these would work with the OEM Tesla 19" Wheels. Does anybody know? I have been looking for a set of locking nuts for the OEM wheels and when I first contacted Gorilla the rep didn't even know that the TMC existed and could not help me find lug nuts. Would like to make sure that these will fit before I order them.

    Thanks for any replies.

    Cheers.
    Although the thread size (14MM), thread pitch (1.5") and seat type (tapered) are the same as the OEM lug nuts, the lug nuts for the Luganos are small diameter. I checked an old email exchange I had with my TM parts adviser from when he took delivery of my aftermarket wheels, and we realized that the stock lug nuts were too wide to work. It turns out that the opening for the lug bolt on the Rial Lugano wheels is approximately 29mm, whereas the stock Model S wheels have an opening diameter of 34mm. Long story short, I do not believe the Gorilla lug nuts I posted above would be suitable to put on the OEM wheels because the OEM nuts are so much wider. I do not know the precise dimension of the OEM nut head offhand, but I will put one in a socket to figure out what they are. I will also take one of the leftover Gorilla lug nuts and see if it fits on the 21" OEM wheels in my basement. Even if it seats, my guess is that the fitment will not be right. There should be plenty of other locking nuts to do the job that have the same diameter as the OEM lug nuts, though. Whatever lug nuts/locking nuts you get, just confirm that they can handle Tesla's torque spec.

  3. #83
    S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13 jerry33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJS1207 View Post
    It turns out that the opening for the lug bolt on the Rial Lugano wheels is approximately 29mm, whereas the stock Model S wheels have an opening diameter of 34mm.
    I'd be kind of worried about smaller nuts/bolts. It's not all that much fun when the wheel pulls over the nuts during hard cornering.
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  4. #84
    Junior Member bonehead's Avatar
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    If I want to go with a staggered fitment with aftermarket wheels, does anyone know if 10" for the rear is TOO wide (rubbing issues, etc)? I'm going 20x8.5 for the front with 245/40/20's. I was considering 265 or 275 for the rears and looks like the majority of 20" wheels come in 8.5" and 10" widths. My "wheel guy" asked me to measure the well, but alas, I have no car yet to do so!

  5. #85
    Senior Member wycolo's Avatar
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    Here is why you should *only* use Tesla's OEM rims:

    Name:  Tesla_S_Lugs_OEM.jpg
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    The OEM rims are uniquely drilled with both a taper area AND a shoulder area. The 125 lbs of torque apportions between these two areas. If you use only tapered nuts you are only doing 1/2 the job necessary to properly attach rim to hub. And the drilling must space the shoulder precisely from the taper; this distance being critical. Plus the S uses 14mm bolts (like on a one ton diesel pickup), not the usual 12mm.

    ModelS is both heavy & powerful; truly in a rare class of cars. Look at the rim specs on similarly powerful cars to get a sense of what is required here. Better to just rely on Tesla to supply you a safe rim. TM charges $1k per set of four 19in rims. That is not much more than these light-duty rims cost.
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    The new Boston service center has some winter tire packages in stock. Unclear if they are for local customers only (I am local). In any case, make sure to call your local service center before doing anything custom.

    Details of the Watertown, MA service station are here:
    Watertown service center is open!!

  7. #87
    Senior Member jcstp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wycolo View Post
    Here is why you should *only* use Tesla's OEM rims:


    The OEM rims are uniquely drilled with both a taper area AND a shoulder area. The 125 lbs of torque apportions between these two areas. If you use only tapered nuts you are only doing 1/2 the job necessary to properly attach rim to hub. And the drilling must space the shoulder precisely from the taper; this distance being critical. Plus the S uses 14mm bolts (like on a one ton diesel pickup), not the usual 12mm.

    ModelS is both heavy & powerful; truly in a rare class of cars. Look at the rim specs on similarly powerful cars to get a sense of what is required here. Better to just rely on Tesla to supply you a safe rim. TM charges $1k per set of four 19in rims. That is not much more than these light-duty rims cost.
    --
    So if I understand correctry, it is best to install truck-wheels on a model S?
    Maybe warn Tirerack.com
    Last edited by dsm363; 12-16-2012 at 07:44 AM. Reason: removed large quoted picture

  8. #88
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    What are the "light duty rims" you are referring to? What "rim specs on similarly powerful cars" should we be looking for?

  9. #89
    S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13 jerry33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJS1207 View Post
    What are the "light duty rims" you are referring to? What "rim specs on similarly powerful cars" should we be looking for?
    Wheels have a max pressure and max load just like tires do. However, it's hard to find these specs because they generally aren't published. You have to contact the wheel manufacturer. It's only of a concern in the outlier cars (ones that are very heavy and very powerful: Model S, 7 series, etc.). Because it's hard for consumers to find the information, sticking with factory approved wheels, or wheels that specifically mention that particular car are the usual choices. Note that the wheel seller (tire shop, car dealer, etc.) is unlikely to either have this information or even be aware that it's a potential problem.
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  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerry33 View Post
    Wheels have a max pressure and max load just like tires do. However, it's hard to find these specs because they generally aren't published. You have to contact the wheel manufacturer. It's only of a concern in the outlier cars (ones that are very heavy and very powerful: Model S, 7 series, etc.). Because it's hard for consumers to find the information, sticking with factory approved wheels, or wheels that specifically mention that particular car are the usual choices. Note that the wheel seller (tire shop, car dealer, etc.) is unlikely to either have this information or even be aware that it's a potential problem.

    Thanks Jerry33. It is a very good point. I checked out the load rating before purchasing the wheels, but I may not have posted the spec previously. The Rial Lugano has a load rating of 735 kg.

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