Blog Comments

  1. KBF's Avatar
    I feel I should chime in here just to reassure people about extreme cold temperatures. I've also had my S through 3 winters here in Manitoba. The week my car was delivered was so cold that the delivery truck's electronics shut down in Dryden, and by the time it got to my house at night it was so cold the lift took half an hour to get my car off (it was on the top row). But the S instantly, perfectly, smoothly drove off the truck without a glitch.

    We hit -40 every winter, and while I keep my car in my insulated garage at home, I did end up at the cabin with only a 110V plug when it hit -55 with the wind chill one New Year's eve. A Tesla rep did say as long as it's plugged in it's not a problem, but I did have trouble with the connector freezing up. I had to take the cable indoors to defrost it for an hour or so and it started working again. Just to be on the safe side I put blankets over the car all around and then shovelled snow to "seal" it in, and the temperature of the car rose to a nice, toasty -19.

    But that's the only time I've had issues - so while I strongly caution against having the car parked outside below -50, -40 doesn't worry me one bit
  2. CUBldr97's Avatar
    Thanks appreciate it, I figured there was basic 6k or 12k mile checks, to include rotating tires, lubricating joints, brake checks etc... didn't know if those were included in cost of car or not. Thanks again.
  3. NOLA_Mike's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by CUBldr97
    What has been the operating costs of your model S? Any unexpected costs other than tires? How about service. What is the normal costs of maintenance, and how frequent?

    I know there isn't much, as compared to an normal car.
    I have been driving a LEAF for the last year, and plan on upgrading to a Model S when my lease is up.

    thanks
    Keith Kauffman
    Keith,

    I bought the prepaid service plan so my maintenance costs have been $0. Nothing unexpected (I haven't even gone through a set of tires yet). I had one normal "maintenance" done at 1 year old which consisted of the tech mostly checking things out, replacing wiper blades and applying a few technical service updates to the car.

    I've have very little need for service visits but when I have needed something Tesla has always sent a tech to my house (no service center anywhere near me) and the work done has been outstanding and all covered under warranty.
  4. CUBldr97's Avatar
    What has been the operating costs of your model S? Any unexpected costs other than tires? How about service. What is the normal costs of maintenance, and how frequent?

    I know there isn't much, as compared to an normal car.
    I have been driving a LEAF for the last year, and plan on upgrading to a Model S when my lease is up.

    thanks
    Keith Kauffman
  5. bga's Avatar
    This should read "Auto industry playing dopy with hydrogen"

    As many respondents have observed, the hydrogen numbers simply don't add up. It is overall much less efficient than electric distribution and storage in a windmill to wheels environment.

    The supposed 100KW automotive fuel stack still has a battery because the fuel cell is really only 30kW and needs the battery for peak power. The Fuel cell + battery is at least as complex as the ICE it replaces and there is no delivery infrastructure for H2.

    The question we should be asking is why??

    I would start with the assumption that this many makers aren't fools, although I would be happy to revise this later. This leads me to believe that there is a covert agenda here.

    I have some suggestions:

    Firstly, building a new delivery infrastructure is going to be expensive, and there's a lot of money to be made in providing it.

    Secondly, BEVs are simple and really low maintenance, which breaks the dealer service model. Companies like Mitsubishi have invented a major service for their i-Miev.

    Thirdly, electricity is not supplied by oil companies and users of BEVs can make their own fuel, so big oil will be irrelevant.

    The solution: Invent a problem.