Blog Comments

  1. Aarya Patil's Avatar
    [QUOTE=smil3193;bt718]Nice story, I enjoyed reading it. Thanks. I've never driven through the Texas Hill Country, maybe I'll take a drive out there one of these days just for fun. Your description and photo make it sound appealing.[/QUOTE]
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  2. bga's Avatar
    This should read "Auto industry playing dopy with hydrogen"

    As many respondents have observed, the hydrogen numbers simply don't add up. It is overall much less efficient than electric distribution and storage in a windmill to wheels environment.

    The supposed 100KW automotive fuel stack still has a battery because the fuel cell is really only 30kW and needs the battery for peak power. The Fuel cell + battery is at least as complex as the ICE it replaces and there is no delivery infrastructure for H2.

    The question we should be asking is why??

    I would start with the assumption that this many makers aren't fools, although I would be happy to revise this later. This leads me to believe that there is a covert agenda here.

    I have some suggestions:

    Firstly, building a new delivery infrastructure is going to be expensive, and there's a lot of money to be made in providing it.

    Secondly, BEVs are simple and really low maintenance, which breaks the dealer service model. Companies like Mitsubishi have invented a major service for their i-Miev.

    Thirdly, electricity is not supplied by oil companies and users of BEVs can make their own fuel, so big oil will be irrelevant.

    The solution: Invent a problem.
  3. Unregistered's Avatar
    hi mike, you sound like an really interesting guy, your thought ful and detailed stories of the model s, provide great insight into the ownership experience and are interesting. I think you should maybe do some youtube videos, anyways keep it up this was one of the best stories from a tesla owner I've read.
  4. Patrick W's Avatar
    Thanks for posting Doug. I'm days away from ordering a Model S and just today asked the Tesla rep about winter driving (I'm in N. Utah). He said not to worry but I might want to sign onto this forum and check for comments on winter driving in an S. I did just that and your post was the first I saw. I feel much better about what I'll encounter next winter.
  5. NOLA_Mike's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by ggenge
    I get my P85D the week of March 23rd, I am so excited.
    You're gonna love it. Amazing car.

    Mike
  6. NOLA_Mike's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by smil3193
    Nice story, I enjoyed reading it. Thanks. I've never driven through the Texas Hill Country, maybe I'll take a drive out there one of these days just for fun. Your description and photo make it sound appealing.
    Miles of scenic highways - I think it's a great trip.

    Thanks,
    Mike
  7. ggenge's Avatar
    I get my P85D the week of March 23rd, I am so excited.
  8. smil3193's Avatar
    Nice story, I enjoyed reading it. Thanks. I've never driven through the Texas Hill Country, maybe I'll take a drive out there one of these days just for fun. Your description and photo make it sound appealing.
  9. ronnussbaum's Avatar
    Virginia is not onboard.
  10. ronnussbaum's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by tezco
    Robert's bridge analogy is completely flawed. When I drive either way across the bridge I am a consumer, and expect to pay. When I draw electricity from the grid, I am also a consumer and expect to pay. On the other hand, when I send electricity to the grid, then I am become a merchant with a product to sell. It's up to our PUC to determine what my power is worth to other users. Our utility thinks my power is worth next to nothing, but in the same breath they want to charge consumers a premium for the power that they produce from their own PV arrays. If Xcel thinks my power is only worth $0.003 per kWh, (their latest argument for locally produced power going to the grid) then they shouldn't be allowed to charge more for their own PV power (Xcel thinks their green PV power is worth $0.16 per kWh) BTW, in Colorado, all users pay a separate monthly fee to Xcel for the grid infrastructure, also set by the PUC, so even someone who balances out on net metering pays the same infrastructure fee as did their next door neighbor.
    Exactly right, the utility companies have a profit mandate and a greed factor in the light of a renewable, non toxic energy source.
  11. andyro's Avatar
    Have had some issues with ice and smart air not able to raise/lower in this last spell of -30c. Garaged the car in heated conditions, melted in very high, then dropped to standard. I've stopped parking the car in very high to avoid recurrence. Anyone else? Also, the new 'drive slowly to reach destination' is very alarming and imo too conservative. Still best to pay attn to consumption graph and mentally calculate distance, rated range and use common sense...